Now is the perfect time to prepare for a new growing year. If your soil isn't frozen, bare-root fruit trees can be planted to allow you to enjoy your own apples, pears or apricots in the summer months! 
For any beginners to 'grow your own', a bare-rooted fruit tree is simply a a tree that has been dug up or 'lifted' from the ground or nursery. It is know as 'bare-rooted' as it will have no compost or soil attached at the root. Some planters would argue that a potted plant, which comes with its own compost, is a better proposition as it usually is more established and doesn't have to be planted straight away. However, potted trees are also more volatile and can go into melt down unless it is delicatly treated. You can also limit your tree selection if you focus on pootted as most nurersies will only be able to provide their full fruit tree range as bare-rooted. So whether it be vigorous or dwarfing trees, espalier or cordon, as maiden young trees or bush older trees, the format suits bare-rooted trees equally and covers the full range of apple, pear, plum, gage, damson, cherry, quince, peach apricot and nectarines. 
Therotecially, a potted tree can be planted at any time of year, but a bare-rooted tree is best planted during Autumn to early spring which to many budding growers may be an great excuse to get back out in the garden during the winter months. To those who would prefer to stay indoors during the cold, a great advantage to a bare-rooted tree is that they don't need watering after planting so once in the ground, they can live without help until the late spring. 
So although there may be a growing demand for trees grown in pots and containers, and that the planting of trees during the summer has increased, it is the bare root form of tree that continues to be most favoured by professional and experienced growers. 
 
For your 2021 garden transformation call us on 01932 943040 or send us an email at info@innovisionlandscapes.co.uk 
 
Photo Credit: gardenerworld.com 
 
Tagged as: Grow Your Own, Winter
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